This is the beautiful laughing Kookaburra (one of the teams favourites) They are instantaneously recognisable by both their plumage and voice. The name “Laughing Kookaburra” refers to the bird’s “laugh”, This call us used to establish territory amongst family groups. It can be heard at any time of day however it is most frequent shortly after dawn and in the early evening after sunset.

It starts with one bird making a low, hiccuping chuckle. It then proceeds to throw its head back in raucous laughter, here often several others will join in. If a rival tribe is within earshot and replies, the whole family soon gathers to fill the bush with ringing laughter. Hearing kookaburras in full voice is an extraordinary experience of the Australian bush and is a sound that will be recognisable to you forever more. The Laughing Kookaburra is native to eastern Australia, however has also been introduced to New Zealand, Tasmania and Western Australia. They are part of the kingfisher family and hunt in a similar way to their smaller cousins. Perching on branches they wait patiently for prey to pass them by.

This is the beautiful laughing Kookaburra (one of the teams favourites) They are instantaneously recognisable by both their plumage and voice. The name “Laughing Kookaburra” refers to the bird’s “laugh”, This call us used to establish territory amongst family groups. It can be heard at any time of day however it is most frequent shortly after dawn and in the early evening after sunset.

It starts with one bird making a low, hiccuping chuckle. It then proceeds to throw its head back in raucous laughter, here often several others will join in. If a rival tribe is within earshot and replies, the whole family soon gathers to fill the bush with ringing laughter. Hearing kookaburras in full voice is an extraordinary experience of the Australian bush and is a sound that will be recognisable to you forever more. The Laughing Kookaburra is native to eastern Australia, however has also been introduced to New Zealand, Tasmania and Western Australia. They are part of the kingfisher family and hunt in a similar way to their smaller cousins. Perching on branches they wait patiently for prey to pass them by.

I never thought I would have the opportunity to see a platypus in the wild… but we did! The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is a semiaquatic mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth. The best chance to see the platypus is in the early morning or late afternoon. This made photographing them a bit of the challenge due to the lack of light. to try overcome this problem i had to bump up the ISO quite high to get a fast enough shutter speed to capture the brief time they spent on the surface before diving down again for food.

I never thought I would have the opportunity to see a platypus in the wild… but we did! The platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) is a semiaquatic mammal endemic to eastern Australia, including Tasmania. Together with the four species of echidna, it is one of the five extant species of monotremes, the only mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth. The best chance to see the platypus is in the early morning or late afternoon. This made photographing them a bit of the challenge due to the lack of light. to try overcome this problem i had to bump up the ISO quite high to get a fast enough shutter speed to capture the brief time they spent on the surface before diving down again for food.

This is a Azure Kingfisher (Alcedo azurea) They are small at just 17-19 cm tall. We were luckily enough to go to Eungella National Park last month. With enough patience and a little bit of luck here you have the chance of seeing wild platypus. There is a commensal feeding relationship between the Azure kingfisher and the platypus ( this basically means that the kingfisher benefits whilst the platypus is unaffected)We continuously witnessed the bird diving into the area where the platypus had been foraging and come up with a fish after the platypus had surfaced. As well as the kingfisher we also saw associated feeding between a shag and a platypus often diving simultaneously side by side.

This is a Azure Kingfisher (Alcedo azurea) They are small at just 17-19 cm tall. We were luckily enough to go to Eungella National Park last month. With enough patience and a little bit of luck here you have the chance of seeing wild platypus. There is a commensal feeding relationship between the Azure kingfisher and the platypus ( this basically means that the kingfisher benefits whilst the platypus is unaffected)We continuously witnessed the bird diving into the area where the platypus had been foraging and come up with a fish after the platypus had surfaced. As well as the kingfisher we also saw associated feeding between a shag and a platypus often diving simultaneously side by side.

The wind has picked up this week which means we have some free time to do some exploring. Yesterday we came across a Goanna - an australian Monitor Lizard. There are around 30 species of goanna known, 25 of which are found in Australia. This photograph shows the lizard in a defensive stance. When threatened they rear up,inflate the flaps of skin around their throats and emit harsh hissing noises. When photographing wild animals the last thing i want to be is disruptive to the animal. I took this as a warning, backed away a little and the lizard crouched back down and carried on its way unbothered by my presence. This was taken using a 400m lens to give you an idea of my distance from the animal and its  large size.

The wind has picked up this week which means we have some free time to do some exploring. Yesterday we came across a Goanna - an australian Monitor Lizard. There are around 30 species of goanna known, 25 of which are found in Australia. This photograph shows the lizard in a defensive stance. When threatened they rear up,inflate the flaps of skin around their throats and emit harsh hissing noises. When photographing wild animals the last thing i want to be is disruptive to the animal. I took this as a warning, backed away a little and the lizard crouched back down and carried on its way unbothered by my presence. This was taken using a 400m lens to give you an idea of my distance from the animal and its  large size.

had been hoping for a super flat day so that i could photograph the commons underwater (from the dryness of the boat)  and was rewarded on my last trip before leaving New Zealand. I wanted to capture how graceful and effortless they make cruising through the water look. It took patience to wait for the dolphin and the light to be in the right place so that i didn’t capture the reflection of the boat on the surface. The slight ripple in the water gives the photograph the dimension it needs to not look flat whilst the lines from the pigmentation (coloration) of the dolphin carries the viewers eyes through the picture. This particular dolphin was an adventurous calf that would dash back and forth from its mother. You can normally tell roughly how old they are by comparing them to the size of an adult. At 6 months of age this would be about half the size

had been hoping for a super flat day so that i could photograph the commons underwater (from the dryness of the boat)  and was rewarded on my last trip before leaving New Zealand. I wanted to capture how graceful and effortless they make cruising through the water look. It took patience to wait for the dolphin and the light to be in the right place so that i didn’t capture the reflection of the boat on the surface. The slight ripple in the water gives the photograph the dimension it needs to not look flat whilst the lines from the pigmentation (coloration) of the dolphin carries the viewers eyes through the picture. This particular dolphin was an adventurous calf that would dash back and forth from its mother. You can normally tell roughly how old they are by comparing them to the size of an adult. At 6 months of age this would be about half the size

These photos are also from the large group encounter of Bottlenose Dolphins. You can see from the dolphin spy hopping that it has a slight pinkish colour on its belly, this is related to the temperature of the water. There was a lot of glare from the sun during this encounter which made taking a good photograph slightly trickier. 

Life got pretty hectic in New Zealand and i fell behind on my blog. However i would still love to share my photos and experiences with you all. I still have a lot of photos to sort through so will post them as i go. However i am also to excited to hold back my photos from Australia so my blog will no longer be in chronological order. 

This photo is of a Bottlenose dolphin ( Tursiops truncatus) taken in the Hauraki Gulf. There were approximately 30 individuals in this pod  (an unusually large group for the gulf) in a reasonably social mood. I kept my eye on this individual in particular who was playing with a piece of seaweed, passing it from its pectoral fin to its tail and back to its beak. I followed the dolphin down the side of the boat but held back from taking any photos and instead kept eye contact with the dolphin which was now swimming on its side looking up at me. As we came to the back of the boat the dolphin swiftly turned and half breached out the water slapping back down on to its side; resulting in this photo. Pretty cool ay! 

Life got pretty hectic in New Zealand and i fell behind on my blog. However i would still love to share my photos and experiences with you all. I still have a lot of photos to sort through so will post them as i go. However i am also to excited to hold back my photos from Australia so my blog will no longer be in chronological order. 

This photo is of a Bottlenose dolphin ( Tursiops truncatus) taken in the Hauraki Gulf. There were approximately 30 individuals in this pod  (an unusually large group for the gulf) in a reasonably social mood. I kept my eye on this individual in particular who was playing with a piece of seaweed, passing it from its pectoral fin to its tail and back to its beak. I followed the dolphin down the side of the boat but held back from taking any photos and instead kept eye contact with the dolphin which was now swimming on its side looking up at me. As we came to the back of the boat the dolphin swiftly turned and half breached out the water slapping back down on to its side; resulting in this photo. Pretty cool ay! 

Ok so as you may have guessed this is not dolphin related. This is the very adorable grandson of my landlady, Brita. After mentioning that she was trying to fundraise a large amount of money to go cycle around Cambodia for a charity called World Vision, i suggested that i could help raise some money by doing some casual family portraits with all proceeds going to the charity. Before heading off on the boat on Saturday i spent about twenty minutes playing with little Toby in the garden and managed to get a couple of shots which i will use for advertising at his nursery. 

It was so nice to be able to just take photos for the fun of it and i finally feel that i am falling back in love with it again. I am looking forward to the next couple of weeks and working with people again- a refreshing change to the wildlife which has had my full attention for the last year.

Ok so as you may have guessed this is not dolphin related. This is the very adorable grandson of my landlady, Brita. After mentioning that she was trying to fundraise a large amount of money to go cycle around Cambodia for a charity called World Vision, i suggested that i could help raise some money by doing some casual family portraits with all proceeds going to the charity. Before heading off on the boat on Saturday i spent about twenty minutes playing with little Toby in the garden and managed to get a couple of shots which i will use for advertising at his nursery.

It was so nice to be able to just take photos for the fun of it and i finally feel that i am falling back in love with it again. I am looking forward to the next couple of weeks and working with people again- a refreshing change to the wildlife which has had my full attention for the last year.

Orca in the city. Time for bed, more tomorrow!

Orca in the city. Time for bed, more tomorrow!

A juvi

A juvi

Dolly Parade

Dolly Parade

They Surfaced a bit close to the boat!

They Surfaced a bit close to the boat!

I am too excited to write anything right now, just wanna get them up… so heres some WHALEEEESSS! (i will get round to it though at some point ) :)

I am too excited to write anything right now, just wanna get them up… so heres some WHALEEEESSS! (i will get round to it though at some point ) :)

Boy oh boy are they big!


It has been a long time since i last saw Bottlenose dolphins and i seemed to forget just how big they are! After seeing the sleek, petite commons the BN’s looked quite intimidating as they approached the boat! I believe there was between 10-12 individuals altogether including a calf and a neonate.It was a real treat to see bottles as the boat sees them on less than 10 percent of there trips! They are most commonly seen around the Bay of Islands.

Thats now 3 of the big 4.. just the Brydes Whale to go! 


I dedicate this photo to my Bro as it’s his birthday today! The dolphins say Hi!

Boy oh boy are they big!


It has been a long time since i last saw Bottlenose dolphins and i seemed to forget just how big they are! After seeing the sleek, petite commons the BN’s looked quite intimidating as they approached the boat! I believe there was between 10-12 individuals altogether including a calf and a neonate.It was a real treat to see bottles as the boat sees them on less than 10 percent of there trips! They are most commonly seen around the Bay of Islands.

Thats now 3 of the big 4.. just the Brydes Whale to go!


I dedicate this photo to my Bro as it’s his birthday today! The dolphins say Hi!

I had a good feeling about today before getting on the boat and sure enough i was in luck. Just as we were leaving the harbour there was a radio call to Dolphin Explorer from a fellow boatsman who had spotted what he thought was an energetic group of common dolphins close to the coast. However, from the description given, it sounded a lot more like Bottlenose behaviour. It was not long before we spotted a big white splash close to shore and sure enough it was the BN’s! 

As for this photo… well it could have been a winning shot if the dolphins had only faced the other way. To say i am a tad frustrated is an understatement! This was about my 5th frame in from the start of the encounter. There were only two more breaches in the time we spent with them and i managed to capture both, however they just don’t match up to this shot. The light, distance from the subject and backdrop couldn’t be more perfect!! Ah well… fingers crossed for a next time!

I had a good feeling about today before getting on the boat and sure enough i was in luck. Just as we were leaving the harbour there was a radio call to Dolphin Explorer from a fellow boatsman who had spotted what he thought was an energetic group of common dolphins close to the coast. However, from the description given, it sounded a lot more like Bottlenose behaviour. It was not long before we spotted a big white splash close to shore and sure enough it was the BN’s!

As for this photo… well it could have been a winning shot if the dolphins had only faced the other way. To say i am a tad frustrated is an understatement! This was about my 5th frame in from the start of the encounter. There were only two more breaches in the time we spent with them and i managed to capture both, however they just don’t match up to this shot. The light, distance from the subject and backdrop couldn’t be more perfect!! Ah well… fingers crossed for a next time!