Ok so as you may have guessed this is not dolphin related. This is the very adorable grandson of my landlady, Brita. After mentioning that she was trying to fundraise a large amount of money to go cycle around Cambodia for a charity called World Vision, i suggested that i could help raise some money by doing some casual family portraits with all proceeds going to the charity. Before heading off on the boat on Saturday i spent about twenty minutes playing with little Toby in the garden and managed to get a couple of shots which i will use for advertising at his nursery. 

It was so nice to be able to just take photos for the fun of it and i finally feel that i am falling back in love with it again. I am looking forward to the next couple of weeks and working with people again- a refreshing change to the wildlife which has had my full attention for the last year.

Ok so as you may have guessed this is not dolphin related. This is the very adorable grandson of my landlady, Brita. After mentioning that she was trying to fundraise a large amount of money to go cycle around Cambodia for a charity called World Vision, i suggested that i could help raise some money by doing some casual family portraits with all proceeds going to the charity. Before heading off on the boat on Saturday i spent about twenty minutes playing with little Toby in the garden and managed to get a couple of shots which i will use for advertising at his nursery.

It was so nice to be able to just take photos for the fun of it and i finally feel that i am falling back in love with it again. I am looking forward to the next couple of weeks and working with people again- a refreshing change to the wildlife which has had my full attention for the last year.

Orca in the city. Time for bed, more tomorrow!

Orca in the city. Time for bed, more tomorrow!

Babies all round!

Babies all round!

A juvi

A juvi

Dolly Parade

Dolly Parade

They Surfaced a bit close to the boat!

They Surfaced a bit close to the boat!

Loook at the baby’s face! NAWWWW!

Loook at the baby’s face! NAWWWW!

I am too excited to write anything right now, just wanna get them up… so heres some WHALEEEESSS! (i will get round to it though at some point ) :)

I am too excited to write anything right now, just wanna get them up… so heres some WHALEEEESSS! (i will get round to it though at some point ) :)

Boy oh boy are they big!


It has been a long time since i last saw Bottlenose dolphins and i seemed to forget just how big they are! After seeing the sleek, petite commons the BN’s looked quite intimidating as they approached the boat! I believe there was between 10-12 individuals altogether including a calf and a neonate.It was a real treat to see bottles as the boat sees them on less than 10 percent of there trips! They are most commonly seen around the Bay of Islands.

Thats now 3 of the big 4.. just the Brydes Whale to go! 


I dedicate this photo to my Bro as it’s his birthday today! The dolphins say Hi!

Boy oh boy are they big!


It has been a long time since i last saw Bottlenose dolphins and i seemed to forget just how big they are! After seeing the sleek, petite commons the BN’s looked quite intimidating as they approached the boat! I believe there was between 10-12 individuals altogether including a calf and a neonate.It was a real treat to see bottles as the boat sees them on less than 10 percent of there trips! They are most commonly seen around the Bay of Islands.

Thats now 3 of the big 4.. just the Brydes Whale to go!


I dedicate this photo to my Bro as it’s his birthday today! The dolphins say Hi!

I had a good feeling about today before getting on the boat and sure enough i was in luck. Just as we were leaving the harbour there was a radio call to Dolphin Explorer from a fellow boatsman who had spotted what he thought was an energetic group of common dolphins close to the coast. However, from the description given, it sounded a lot more like Bottlenose behaviour. It was not long before we spotted a big white splash close to shore and sure enough it was the BN’s! 

As for this photo… well it could have been a winning shot if the dolphins had only faced the other way. To say i am a tad frustrated is an understatement! This was about my 5th frame in from the start of the encounter. There were only two more breaches in the time we spent with them and i managed to capture both, however they just don’t match up to this shot. The light, distance from the subject and backdrop couldn’t be more perfect!! Ah well… fingers crossed for a next time!

I had a good feeling about today before getting on the boat and sure enough i was in luck. Just as we were leaving the harbour there was a radio call to Dolphin Explorer from a fellow boatsman who had spotted what he thought was an energetic group of common dolphins close to the coast. However, from the description given, it sounded a lot more like Bottlenose behaviour. It was not long before we spotted a big white splash close to shore and sure enough it was the BN’s!

As for this photo… well it could have been a winning shot if the dolphins had only faced the other way. To say i am a tad frustrated is an understatement! This was about my 5th frame in from the start of the encounter. There were only two more breaches in the time we spent with them and i managed to capture both, however they just don’t match up to this shot. The light, distance from the subject and backdrop couldn’t be more perfect!! Ah well… fingers crossed for a next time!

I think this photograph can be compared to Marmite. You will either love it or hate it. I have gone for a more abstract approach this time. Sharks are remarkably difficult to photograph from above the water. Being a fish they do not come to the surface for air, however they will come up ever so often to sun bath as such. Most sharks (excluding a few) are ectothermic (cold blooded), which means that their body temperature is similar to the surrounding water temperature and they can’t regulate their body temperature through internal physiological processes. Therefore, behavioural mechanisms such as spending time in the warmer surface waters are needed to warm them up. When Watching these guys swim there is almost something ghostly about they way the silently move through the water and i wanted to portray that in my image, hence converting it into black and white. The slight rippling of the water distorts the image further evoking that eerie motion.

I think this photograph can be compared to Marmite. You will either love it or hate it. I have gone for a more abstract approach this time. Sharks are remarkably difficult to photograph from above the water. Being a fish they do not come to the surface for air, however they will come up ever so often to sun bath as such. Most sharks (excluding a few) are ectothermic (cold blooded), which means that their body temperature is similar to the surrounding water temperature and they can’t regulate their body temperature through internal physiological processes. Therefore, behavioural mechanisms such as spending time in the warmer surface waters are needed to warm them up. When Watching these guys swim there is almost something ghostly about they way the silently move through the water and i wanted to portray that in my image, hence converting it into black and white. The slight rippling of the water distorts the image further evoking that eerie motion.

Together with the combination of multiple predator free breeding sites on islands and (increasingly) on the mainland with productive waters close to colonies, the Hauraki Gulf is a globally significant seabird biodiversity hotspot. This is pretty remarkable given its proximity to the doorstep of the country’s largest city. This particular bird is a Buller’s shearwater. The world’s population of this species as well as the black petrels and Pycroft’s petrels breed exclusively on the islands that dot the wider Hauraki Gulf. The water was so still on wednesday that i managed to capture a double reflection of the shearwater.I have been playing around with the use of negative space to try and give the impression of openness and solitude.

Together with the combination of multiple predator free breeding sites on islands and (increasingly) on the mainland with productive waters close to colonies, the Hauraki Gulf is a globally significant seabird biodiversity hotspot. This is pretty remarkable given its proximity to the doorstep of the country’s largest city. This particular bird is a Buller’s shearwater. The world’s population of this species as well as the black petrels and Pycroft’s petrels breed exclusively on the islands that dot the wider Hauraki Gulf. The water was so still on wednesday that i managed to capture a double reflection of the shearwater.I have been playing around with the use of negative space to try and give the impression of openness and solitude.

Common Dolphins jumping in the bow wake of a container ship… much more exciting compared to our little boat!

Common Dolphins jumping in the bow wake of a container ship… much more exciting compared to our little boat!

The Wolves of the sea! There are estimated to be fewer than 200 Orcas split between three residential groups living in New Zealand waters. One off the North Island, one off the South Island, and a third group that spends its time in both. However this does not mean that they have a confined home patch and travel vast distances everyday making it very hard to find them. Although i was hoping to see them in my four months of being here my chances where very slim, so to see them on my 2nd boat trip i was astounded. Compared to those elsewhere, New Zealand orcas have an unusual diet. They are the only group known to hunt stingrays, eagle rays and electric rays as a staple food. Something that we observed whilst in their company. Each time orca are sighted the protocol is to call the Orca Hotline created by Ingrid Visser, New Zealand’s Orca Researcher. The photographs from this encounter have been sent to her, and i look forward to maybe finding out who the individual orcas are!

The Wolves of the sea! There are estimated to be fewer than 200 Orcas split between three residential groups living in New Zealand waters. One off the North Island, one off the South Island, and a third group that spends its time in both. However this does not mean that they have a confined home patch and travel vast distances everyday making it very hard to find them. Although i was hoping to see them in my four months of being here my chances where very slim, so to see them on my 2nd boat trip i was astounded. Compared to those elsewhere, New Zealand orcas have an unusual diet. They are the only group known to hunt stingrays, eagle rays and electric rays as a staple food. Something that we observed whilst in their company. Each time orca are sighted the protocol is to call the Orca Hotline created by Ingrid Visser, New Zealand’s Orca Researcher. The photographs from this encounter have been sent to her, and i look forward to maybe finding out who the individual orcas are!

Eye to Eye.

For a short while one of the Orcas split away from the others to come and inspect the boat. She raced in from behind the boat until she was in line with us where she proceeded to roll onto her side and peer up at us. She hung there, just under the surface for what felt like a lifetime but was probably no longer than 30 seconds. It seemed as if she was just as interested in us as we were with her. It was the most enchanting encounter i have ever shared with another species and the memory will stay with me forever.

Eye to Eye.

For a short while one of the Orcas split away from the others to come and inspect the boat. She raced in from behind the boat until she was in line with us where she proceeded to roll onto her side and peer up at us. She hung there, just under the surface for what felt like a lifetime but was probably no longer than 30 seconds. It seemed as if she was just as interested in us as we were with her. It was the most enchanting encounter i have ever shared with another species and the memory will stay with me forever.